OVERVIEW OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT

The dissolution of Local Government led to the transfer of solid waste management to the Ministry of Health. The Environmental Health Department then became directly responsible for the collection, transportation and final disposal of solid waste and the provision of street cleaning within the boundaries of the six towns. While solid waste management was under the Ministry of Health, collection service was provided basically to the towns and their environs. Consequently, the coverage for waste collection did not exceed 60%. At the time, there were several inefficiencies in the service including inadequacy of trucks, poorly maintained equipment and low moral among workers, resulting in a costly operated system. Solid waste management conditions therefore manifested itself as a public health problem, a threat to the environment and the economy and tourism in particular. There were frequent overflowing collection receptacles, which were odorous and unsightly, as well as, the final disposal taking place at three dumpsites.For these reasons the World Bank, assisting in its role as catalysis, succeeded in bringing together the six OECS Countries(Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, St. Kitts/Nevis, St. Lucia and St. Vincent and the Grenadines) to jointly address this most urgent environmental problem facing the sub-region. Consequently there was the establishment of the OECS Solid and Ship-generated Waste Management Project to assist the OECS countries in the development of a coordinated regional strategy supported by action plans. The project involved the implementation of a series of environmentally oriented activities at the national level that were similar for each of the OECS countries and a regional component which covered issues common to all. The regional component was implemented by the OECS through the Natural Resources Management Unit (NRMU) which based in St. Lucia. The project purpose was to reduce terrestrial and marine pollution in this area through avoiding and discouraging indiscriminate disposal of solid wastes both on and offshore. It’s aim was to reduce public health risks and protect the environmental integrity of the islands and their coastal and marine systems by improving domestic solid waste management facilities and facilitating compliance with the “Special Area” designation of the Caribbean Sea for MARPOL 73/78 annex waste.

back to top

Objectives of the project:

The major project objectives were to assist the OECS governments in:* Improving the coverage and effectiveness of domestic solid waste collection and disposal facilities; Reducing pollution of international and territorial waters caused by ship-generated solid waste; Improving the collection, treatment and disposal of ship-generated waste; Assisting the beneficiary countries in the establishment of appropriate legal and institutional frame works to enable effective management and disposal of shore and ship-generated waste; Assisting in the preparation of plans and programmes to address the problems of collection, treatment and disposal of liquid waste; and Identifying regional opportunities for reduction, recovery and recycling of solid waste.

back to top

Project Component:

The project was comprised of a National Component, which includes the establishment of autonomous, financially viable institutions, construction of new engineer-designed sanitary landfills, closure of several dumps and illegal disposal sites, acquisition of new equipment and containers for collection and disposal of garbage, and facilities for receiving ship-generated waste in all of the participating OECS countries. The regional component was aimed at providing technical assistance such as training, education and public awareness programs in solid waste management. This served to help in developing regional approaches to such issues as solid waste management legislation and markets for recyclable materials. The Regional Component was designed to ensure that the project is implemented in a timely and efficient manner and that the full benefits of the project are realized.

back to top

ESTABLISHEMENT OF THE GRENADA SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT AUTHORITY:

An outcome of the OECS Solid and Ship-Generated Waste Management Project was the establishment of Grenada Solid Waste Management Authority (GSWMA). Act No.11 of 1995 and amended by Act No.30 of 1995 which constituted the Authority. The Act provides the mandate through which the Authority can assume the responsibility for solid waste collection and disposal. However, the regulatory and enforcement functions for solid waste management remains with the Ministry of Health. In an effort to carry out its function, the Authority adopted as it Motto 'Striving for a Cleaner and Healthier Environment'. With our mission being 'To improve the Quality of life of the Grenadian public and the protection and enhancement of the environment through the provision of effective management and an efficient, reliable and acceptable solid waste service.

back to top

DISPOSAL:

Two new landfills were constructed and became operational in February 2001. The two new landfills replaced the three open dumpsites (Telescope, Perseverance and Dumfries, Carriacou). These sites were closed and rehabilitated.At Perseverance waste collection vehicles are now weighted to determine the quantity of waste. Also the waste is categorized according to it origin (domestic, institutional, commercial etc.).

back to top

PUBLIC RELATION/EDUCATION GSWMA:

The Authority established a public relation division with the employment of one officer. Currently, the Authority carryout daily radio programmes informing the public about the collection service and offers tips on good solid waste management practices. Activities are also undertaken with school and civic organizations.There has been community participation in various promotional programmes undertaken.

back to top


CONCLUSION:

Despite the many achievements of the Authority and solid waste management in Grenada, in general, there continue to be in existence a plethora of unacceptable solid waste management practices. In some cases public attitudes and action are defeating good intension, for example the callous attitudes of some households to the collection and disposal system. Too often households place garbage for collection at inappropriate times. The practice lends itself to littering by animals which forage through waste. Similarly, open trucks when transporting garbage without coverings or other restraint contribute significantly to the litter problem. Consequently there is need for extensive work in public education and promotional aspects of solid waste. The enforcement of the Waste management Act No. 16 of 2001 will be a tremendous asset in curbing illegal waste disposal practices and regulating solid waste management in general.Grenada has reached that stage of development whereby waste must be seen as a resource and be treated as such. The practice of landfilling all waste generated cannot continue. If left unchecked, Grenada may soon run out of space for the disposal of waste. Composting, in addition to paper and glass recycling seem to offer the best prospects of waste reduction. Over 45% of the waste stream in biodegradable.The introduction of a tipping fee can serve as catalysis for the development of waste reduction and waste minimization initiatives and techniques of recycling and reuse by the commercial and industrial waste generators. Additionally, the implementation of the tipping fee will greatly assist the Authority is ensuring financial sustainability at the same time make certain that the commercial and industrial generators of waste contribute to the management of solid waste.

back to top


g